The definitive guide to South Asian lingo

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1 2
Noun.
0

Definition

Gun Powder: Well a powder made with lentils which is consumed with Idli, the overconsumption of which has been know to cause the human bum to turn into a machine gun of sorts

Usage

Waiter: idli sambar sir?
Guest: Gun Powder also
Added 2011-11-23 by MahaGyaani

Root

English

Region

All India

Categories

Food and Drink

Related Terms

Loose motion
38 2
Noun. March 30, 2012, Word of the Day
0

Definition

Ever eaten a genuine home-made dosai or iddli? I don't mean the restaurant style "dosa" and "idly" which have nothing to do with the fragrant, fluffy, pale gold beauties flying off a griddle or the jasmine-white, jasmine-delicate, plump, steam-cooked gifts from the kitchen-goddesses of the south of India. These are eaten with a red hot powder, thickened to a tongue-stinging paste with gingelli oil (yes, that's what til-oil is called where mornings begin with coffee and The Hindu). Ah, this has to be heaven on a banana leaf. And if you've ever been on a picnic with the Tamil folks, you would have seen iddlis smeared with gunpowder and oil guzzled with gusto by one and all, while even a tiny piece made your eyes water and the insides of your throat swell. This is the stuff without which no tiffin box gets packed for a train journey. Care for a recipe? There exists none. Every home has its own secret formula, but there is one common ingredient: the dried red chilly measured in cupfuls.
Note--I am told that among Telugu speakers, the term "gunpowder" is used for the dal powder you mix with hot rice and ghee.

Usage

"Amma, don't tell me we're out of gunpowder. How am I going to pack appa's tiffin for his train?"
Added 2011-09-05 by oldathai

Root

English

Region

Tamil Nadu

Categories

Food and Drink

Related Terms

chutney podi

Gym Body

\Jimbaadi\
6 0
Phrase.
0

Definition

Usually pronounced as a single word, "jimbaadi", refers to someone whose physique is honed, relatively speaking.
If you are stout, but not fat and do not have a very visible paunch, then a relatively tight t-shirt will also do the trick

Usage

He: Macha, Krish has a pretty good gym body. he exercises'aa?
Me: ille da, he simply wears S or M T-shirts instead of L
Added 2011-08-31 by Side Character

Root

English

Region

All India

Categories

Sports & Games

Related Terms

Gymson, gymkhanas

Terms referencing this

Chumbak, Tight T-shirt

gumboot

\pro-nunn-see-ay-shun\
2 0
Exclamation.
0

Definition

If guns make dishoom dishoom sounds and chooths are fatangs and your naadan badboy makes gadbad as you drag it through the airport with your big jingbang party then pray what is the sound of the dholak?

According to Livemint, its gumboot!

Rhythm players use the term to indicate the specific sound produced on the dholak.

Usage

"For example, what would you do if you were asked to play a rhythm pattern called “78”? You or I could just sit there looking completely befuddled, but a sessions musician would know instantly that he had to play a specific rhythm pattern that became exceedingly popular in 1978! And if 78 isn’t funny enough, how about making sense of “gumboot”! Yes, that’s right. Rhythm players use the term to indicate the specific sound produced on the dholak"

Source: Livemint.com

Added 2011-08-05 by Dishoom Dishoom